Woman identity stolen from facebook for dating website

Sherkin tells us she decided to Go Public to warn others how easy it is to end up in the same situation — and she also wonders whether the company's behaviour crosses another line. They violated me, my profile, my information, they took my identity.

He had convinced them that he was a diplomat and that a US marine general had fallen in love with them, causing one woman to pawn jewelry, empty her life savings, sell her car, and take out loans to help this general move to the UK. In 2011, the Internet Crime Complaint Center estimated that the online dating scamming “industry” was worth over million, but it’s likely much higher than that, due to the difficulty of making a good estimate.People are often ashamed to come forward and admit that they’ve been duped."My palms started sweating, my heart started racing, my stomach started doing flip-flops. "This open authentication scheme is used by Facebook, it's used by Google, it's used by Twitter. I was absolutely mortified." And Mari isn't the only one.How are organizations striking the balance between new initiatives and cost control?

Download our report to learn about the biggest challenges and how savvy IT executives are overcoming them."By accessing or using our services through a social networking site, you are authorizing Zoosk to collect, store, retain and use, in accordance with our privacy policy, any and all of your information that Zoosk has obtained from the social networking site, including to create a Zoosk profile page and account for you." The company says it no longer puts pop-up ads on Facebook.Like a lot of people, Sherkin was surprised to hear how easy — and perfectly legal — it is for users to give their personal information away.In a written statement to Go Public, communications director general Anne-Marie Hayden writes: "Our office has long been raising concerns about overly complex privacy policies and highlighting the need for companies to obtain informed consent for the collection and use of personal information." So where does the problem lie?The answer is complicated, according to Sharon Polsky, who heads up the independent advocacy group Privacy and Access Council of Canada.This is made possible by OAuth open authorization protocol, which allows users to share social media data with third parties.